Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Equipment Leasing DPPs

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA

We’ve written extensively about the evils of non-traded REITs. You can find our non-traded REIT blog posts here. As bad as non-traded REITs are – and they’re so bad no one should ever buy one – registered, non-traded Equipment Leasing Direct Participation Programs (DPPs) are worse.

Examples of equipment leasing DPPs include the series of LEAF and ICON trusts we discuss below. Equipment leasing DPPs provide a stark illustration of the DPP deceit which infects non-traded REITs, non-traded BDCs and oil & gas and managed futures DPPs. These investments can only be sold because of the motivation provided by high DPP sales commissions and the lack of price transparency and market discipline.

Direct Participation Programs are registered with the SEC and sold to retail investors but not listed on public exchanges. Without an active secondary market for the shares, there is no reliable way for retail investors to independently judge the prices charged by sponsors and brokerage firms. This lack of secondary trading in shares of DPPs also allows inefficient and self-serving management that would be disciplined by the market for corporate control to persist and harm DPP investors.

In an equipment leasing DPPs a sponsor sells limited partnership units, deducts substantial offering costs and invests the remainder in a pool of equipment leases leveraged up with additional borrowing. Like other DPPs, equipment leasing DPPs market a predictable income stream but a substantial portion of distributions to investors are a return of capital not of income. Equipment leasing partnerships promote the tax benefits investors can achieve through depreciation deductions and interest payments on borrowing used to leverage. The depreciation and interest deductions can only be used to offset income from other passive investments and so this “benefit” is trivial for most investors.

The purchased leases can either be operating leases or full-payout leases. In operating leases, the trust retains ownership of the equipment and counts on the residual value of the equipment to be great enough, when combined with the lease payments received over the term of the lease, to pay the cost of the equipment including borrowing costs and return a profit to investors. In financing or “full payout” leases the trust has no residual interest in the equipment but is instead just financing the operator’s purchase and use of the equipment. Investors in equipment leasing DPPs are effectively putting up capital and borrowing money to make loans backed by equipment to poor credit-quality borrowers.

As if that wasn’t bad enough, the sponsor and its affiliates deduct high up front and annual fees which guarantee that investors will lose money. Figure 1 is a table from the LEAF III prospectus available on the SEC website here.

Figure 1. Fee Table excerpt from LEAF III Prospectus


In this altogether typical equipment leasing DPP, upfront fees are 21.27% and reserves are 1% of investor’s capital. The Sponsor was to take $25,527,491 in fees from the $120,000,000 raised, set aside $1,200,000 in reserves and invest only $93,272,509 in leases. In a competitive market the investment returns on $93.3 million in leases cannot generate returns sufficient to compensate investors for risks borne on $120,000,000 of invested capital.

In addition to the cash investments in leases, LEAF III financed 80% of its lease portfolio with debt. The Sponsor received a 2% acquisition fee and 4% of gross rental revenue on operating leases and 2% of gross revenue on full payout leases each year. Thus, the Sponsor was paid for enlarging the lease portfolio quickly without regard for the financing costs or the quality of the leases bought, creating enormous conflicts of interest and ensured investors would lose money.

Completely predictably, LEAF III investors suffered significant losses. Figure 2 summarizes LEAF III results from 2007 to 2013. LEAF III investors’ losses are indicative of losses suffered by investors in equipment leasing DPPs more generally. The amortized offering costs, acquisition and management fees charged by the Sponsor can only be covered by lease revenues if there are no credit losses on leases extended to bad credit quality borrowers who face less penalty upon default than if they defaulted on bonds. That is, these equipment leasing programs might work if and only if the leases were backed by the full faith and credit of the US Treasury. Not surprisingly, credit losses have been substantial.

Figure 2. LEAF III’s Predictable Losses


Figures 3 and 4 present investors’ experience in the LEAF and ICON leasing programs. For each equipment leasing DPP we calculate the amount investors have made or lost. Investors in the LEAF series have lost $224.5 million and investors in the ICON series have lost $177.5 million as of December 31, 2013. Investors in bonds, stocks and even stocks of publicly traded equipment leasing companies earned substantial returns.

If an investor wanted equity exposure to equipment leases, he/she could buy common stock in equipment leasing companies. The losses investors suffer in equipment leasing DPPs are a result of high fees and shocking conflicts of interest – not problems in the equipment leasing or broader stock market. Figure 3 reports that had the same investments investors made in the LEAF funds been made instead in a market-capitalization weighted portfolio of publicly traded leasing companies, investors would have made $292 million. Thus, LEAF program investors lost $515 million by virtue of LEAF’s high costs and conflicts of interest. If the LEAF investors had invested the same amounts, at the same times, in the broad stock market they would have earned $186 million and would have earned $83 million in Treasury securities.

Figure 3. LEAF Equipment Leasing Programs1

Figure 4 reports that had the same investments investors made in the ICON funds been made instead in a market-capitalization weighted portfolio of publicly traded leasing companies, investors would have made $969 million. Thus, ICON program investors lost $1,146 million by virtue of ICON’s high costs and conflicts of interest. If the ICON investors had invested the same amounts, at the same times, in the broad stock market they would have earned $684 million and would have earned $363 million in Treasury securities.

Figure 4. ICON Equipment Leasing Programs
 
Thus despite being tied up in risky, illiquid investments for many years, investors in equipment leasing DPPs received substantially less than their original investments when investors in the equipment leasing industry, and in the broad stock and bond markets earned substantial returns.

1 Observant readers will note that the first two LEAF funds were called “Lease Equity Appreciation Fund I and II. It appears in the review process the SEC required LEAF to insert this language into the Lease Equity Appreciation Fund II registration statement. “Despite being named "Lease Equity Appreciation Fund II, L.P.," our equipment leases will not have any equity appreciation.” See http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1294154/000095011604003124/s-1a.txt. None of the Lease Equity Appreciation Fund I filings or previous versions of the registration statements for Lease Equity Appreciation Fund II contained this language undoing the blatantly misleading naming of the funds.

Thursday, November 13, 2014

What Hell Hath UBS Puerto Rico Wrought

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA and Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA Versión en Español

We’ve shown in recent posts that UBS underwrote $1.7 billion of unmarketable ERS and $1.35 billion of COFINA bonds and bought them into the UBS PR Funds in 2007 and 2008. You can find our earlier blog posts available here. UBS made room for these ERS and COFINA bonds by selling out of the Funds, roughly $3 billion of other bonds UBS didn’t underwrite. UBS bought the ERS and COFINA bonds it underwrote in 2007 and 2008, because there was no other market for the bonds it was underwriting.

In a December 2013 post here, we wrote of the conflicts of interest first identified by David Evans of Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, February 27, 2009, Bloomberg) which led UBS to stuff the Retirement System Bonds into UBS’s Funds.

The disastrous losses suffered by investors in the UBS PR Funds in 2013 are directly traceable to UBS putting its interests ahead of its clients in 2008 as we show in three examples.

Fixed Income Fund II’s

Figure 1 categorizes the Fixed Income Fund II’s November 30, 2012 holdings into ERS, COFINA and Other. ERS bonds are 27.5% of the portfolio, COFINA bonds are 21.3% of the portfolio and Other Investments are 51.1% of the portfolio. The ERS bonds lost 50.3% of their value from November 30, 2012 to December 13, 2013. The COFINA bonds lost 29.7% from November 30, 2012 to December 13, 2013. Other investments in the Fund lost between 4.8% and 15.8% of their value between November 30, 2012 and December 31, 2013. If the ERS and COFINA bonds had only suffered the losses suffered on the rest of the Fixed Income Fund II’s portfolio, the Fund would have only lost $140.2 million instead of between $201 and $251 million.1

Figure 1. Fixed Income Fund II Asset and Losses Allocation

 
Fixed Income Fund III

The same pattern found in the Fixed Income Fund III can be observed in the other UBS PR funds. Figure 2 presents similar analysis for Fixed Income Fund III. ERS bonds are 28.1% of the portfolio, COFINA bonds are 15.1% of the portfolio and Other Investments are 56.8% of the portfolio.

The ERS bonds lost 45.4% from June 30, 2013 to December 13, 2013. The COFINA bonds lost 26.2% from June 30, 2013 to December 13, 2013. Other investments in the Fund lost between 2.6% and 12.5% of their value between June 30, 2013 and December 31, 2013.

If the ERS and COFINA bonds had only suffered the losses suffered on the rest of the Fund’s portfolio the Fund would have only lost $103.6 million instead of between $151 million and $197 million.

Figure 2. Fixed Income Fund III Asset and Losses Allocation

Fixed Income Fund IV

Figure 3 presents similar analysis for Fixed Income Fund IV. ERS bonds are 25.2% of the portfolio, COFINA bonds are 19.4% of the portfolio and Other Investments are 55.4% of the portfolio.

The ERS bonds lost 44.8% from March 31, 2013 to December 13, 2013. The COFINA bonds lost 27.7% from March 31, 2013 to December 13, 2013. Other investments in the Fund lost between 8.0% and 12.2% of their value between March 31, 2013 and December 31, 2013.

If the ERS and COFINA bonds had only suffered the losses suffered on the rest of the Fund’s portfolio the Fund would have only lost $107 million instead of $206 ($185) million.

Figure 3. Fixed Income Fund IV Asset and Losses Allocation

So now we see what hell hath UBS wrought with its self-dealing. We estimate these three funds lost between $537 million and $654 million. Of these losses, the UBS underwritten ERS and COFINA bonds lost $464 million. That is, between 71% and 86% of the billions of dollars the UBS PR Funds lost in 2013 was the direct result of the UBS underwritten ERS and COFINA bonds for which there was no market.

1 We estimated a range of possible losses on the Funds’ portfolios because the Funds do not produce financial statements for the periods over which we have spanning holdings data and the number of units of each fund changes significantly over time.

El Infierno Forjado por UBS Puerto Rico

Por Craig J. McCann, PhD, CFA y Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA English Version

En entradas recientes al blog hemos demostrado que UBS suscribió $1.7 billones de bonos inmercadeables de la ASR y $1.35 billones de bonos de la COFINA y luego los compró para colocarlos en sus Fondos UBS PR en el 2007 y 2008. Pueden encontrar nuestra entrada anterior aquí. UBS hizo cabida a estos bonos de la COFINA y de la ASR vendiendo bonos que los Fondos tenían (alrededor de $3 billones) pero que no habían sido suscritos por UBS. UBS compró los bonos que suscribió en el 2007 y en el 2008 de la COFINA y de la ASR, porque no había otro mercado para los bonos que estaba suscribiendo.

En una entrada a nuestro blog del mes de diciembre de 2013 publicada aquí, escribimos sobre los conflictos de intereses que David Evans identificó por primera vez en su artículo en Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, February 27, 2009, Bloomberg) que llevaron a UBS a comprar bonos del Sistema de Retiro en Bonos UBS.

Las pérdidas desastrosas del 2013 sufridas por los inversionistas en el Fondos UBS PR están directamente relacionas a que UBS puso sus propios intereses por encima de los intereses de sus clientes en el 2008 como enseñamos en los próximos tres ejemplos.

Fondo Fixed Income Fund II

La Tabla 1 categoriza los valores de la ASR, COFINA y otros emisores al 30 de noviembre de 2012 del fondo Fixed Income Fund II. Los bonos de la ARS representan 27.5% de la cartera, los bonos de la COFINA 21.3 % de la cartera y otras inversiones son el 51.1 % de la cartera. Los bonos de la ASR perdieron un 50.3 % de su valor entre el 30 de noviembre de 2012 y el 13 de diciembre de 2013. Los bonos de la COFINA perdieron el 29.7 % desde el 30 de noviembre de 2012 al 13 de diciembre de 2013. Las otras inversiones en el fondo perdieron entre un 4.8 % y el 15.8 % de su valor entre el 30 de noviembre de 2012 y el 31 de diciembre de 2013. Si los bonos de la ASR y los bonos de la COFINA sólo hubiesen sufrido pérdidas similares al resto de la cartera del fondo Fixed Income Fund II, el Fondo sólo hubiese perdido $140.2 millones en vez de los $201 a $251 millones perdidos.1

Tabla 1. Asignación de Activos y Pérdidas del Fondo Fixed Income Fund II


Fondo Fixed Income Fund III

El mismo patrón encontrado en el fondo Fixed Income Fund III puede ser observado en otros fondos UBS PR. La Tabla 2 presenta un análisis similar para el fondo Fixed Income Fund III. Los bonos de la ASR representaban un 28.1 % de la cartera, los bonos de la COFINA un 15.1 % de la cartera y otras inversiones son un 56.8 % de la cartera.

Los bonos de la ASR perdieron 45.4 % entre el 30 de junio de 2013 y el 13 de diciembre de 2013. Los bonos de la COFINA perdieron el 26.2 % entre el 30 de junio de 2013 y el 13 de diciembre de 2013. El resto de las inversiones en el fondo perdieron entre un 2.6 % y 12.5 % de su valor entre el 30 de junio de 2013 y el 31 de diciembre de 2013.

Si los bonos de la ASR y de la COFINA sólo hubiesen sufrido pérdidas similares al resto de la cartera del Fondo, el Fondo sólo hubiese tenido pérdidas de $103.6 millones en lugar de los $151 millones a los $197 millones.

Tabla 2. Asignación de Activos y Pérdidas del Fondo Fixed Income Fund III


Fondo Fixed Income Fund IV

La Tabla 3 presenta un análisis similar para el Fondo Fixed Income Fund IV. Los bonos de la ASR representan un 25.2% de la cartera, los bonos de la COFINA un 19.4% de la cartera y los de otras inversiones eran el 55.4% de la cartera.

Entre el 31 de marzo de 2013 y el 31 de diciembre de 2013, los bonos de la ASR perdieron 44.8% de su valor. Durante el mismo período los bonos de la COFINA perdieron el 27.7% de su valor. El resto de las inversiones del fondo perdieron entre un 8.0% y un 12.2% de su valor entre el 31 de marzo de 2013 y el 31 de diciembre de 2013.

Si los bonos de la ASR y de la COFINA sólo hubiesen sufrido pérdidas similares al resto de la cartera del Fondo, el Fondo sólo hubiese tenido pérdidas de $107 millones en lugar de los $206 ($185) millones.

Tabla 3. Asignación de Activos y Pérdidas del Fondo Fixed Income Fund IV


Así que ahora vemos el infierno forjado por UBS con sus auto-negociaciones. Estimamos que estos tres fondos perdieron entre $537 millones y $654 millones. De estas pérdidas, los bonos suscritos por UBS de la ASR y de la COFINA representaron pérdidas de $464 millones. Esto significa que entre el 71% y el 86% de los billones de dólares perdidos en los Fondos UBS PR, fue el resultado directo de los bonos suscritos por UBS de la ASR y de la COFINA que además no tenían mercado.

1 Hemos estimado un rango de posibles pérdidas en la cartera del Fondo dado que el fondo no produce reportes financieros para los periodos que tenemos disponibles en relación a la data de valores y el número de unidades de bonos que cada fondo posee cambia significativamente a lo largo del tiempo.

Friday, November 7, 2014

En el 2007 y 2008, Los Fondos UBS PR También Compraron $1.35 Billones en Bonos de la COFINA Suscritos por UBS

Por Craig McCann, PhD, CFA y Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA English Version

Ayer demostramos que en el 2008, UBS suscribió $1.7 billones de bonos inmercadeables de la ASR y los compró para sus Fondos UBS PR, disponible aquí. Hoy, mostraremos que del año 2007 al año 2008 conflictos similares llevaron a UBS a suscribir bonos inmercadeables de la Corporación del Fondo de Interés Apremiante (COFINA) para colocarlos en sus Fondos.

COFINA Serie 2007A

El banco de inversión UBS fue uno de los diecinueve co-suscritores de los $2.7 billones de bonos Serie A dirigidos a inversionistas estadounidenses. Véase el Gráfico 1.

Gráfico 1. Extracto de la 1era Página de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos Serie 2007A de la COFINA (documento completo disponible aquí)

COFINA 2007 Serie B

UBS Financial Services de Puerto Rico fue el suscritor principal (con otros 11 co-suscritores) de los bonos Serie B vendidos solamente a inversionistas puertorriqueños por $1.33 billones Véase el Gráfico 2.

Gráfico 2. Extracto de la 1era Página de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos Serie 2007B de la COFINA (documento completo disponible aquí)

No sabemos cuál fue el compromiso de ventas de los bonos COFINA 2007 Serie B por parte de UBS, pero sí sabemos que UBS compró $614 millones o 46% de los $1.330 billones en Bonos de la COFINA 2007 Serie B para sus fondos mutuos. Véase el gráfico 3.

Gráfico 3. UBS compró $614 millones de Bonos COFINA 2007 Serie B para sus Fondos Mutuos.

COFINA 2008 Serie A

En el 2008, UBS Financial Services de Puerto Rico fue el único suscritor de los $737 millones en bonos Serie B vendidos únicamente a inversionistas puertorriqueños. Ninguno de los otros 18 suscritores de la Serie 2007 A o de los demás 11 suscritores de los Bonos COFINA Serie 2007 B participaron en los Bonos COFINA Serie 2008 B. Véase el Gráfico 4.

Gráfico 4. Extracto de la 1era Página de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos Serie 2008 A de la COFINA (documento completo disponible aquí)

UBS adquirió el 100% de los $737 millones de los Bonos de la COFINA Serie 2008A para sus fondos mutuos. Véase el Gráfico 5.

Gráfico 5. UBS compró $735 millones en Bonos de la COFINA Serie 2008A para sus fondos.

En el 2007 y 2008, UBS compró los bonos que suscribió de la COFINA al igual como lo hizo con los bonos de la ASR, vendiendo de otros valores en las carteras de sus fondos para darle cabida a los Bonos de la ASR y de la COFINA. O no había otro mercado para los bonos de la COFINA Serie A o UBS usó el control de sus fondos para maximizar sus beneficios como suscritor y vendedor de los bonos Serie 2008A de la COFINA.

Hemos escrito extensamente sobre los Fondos de Bonos Municipales UBS Puerto Rico. Pueden encontrar nuestra más reciente entrada al blog aquí. En una entrada al blog en diciembre de 2013 (aquí), escribimos sobre los conflictos de intereses identificados por primera vez en Bloomberg por David Evans (artículo en inglés: David Evans, Bonanza de UBS en Pensiones de Puerto Rico Visto como Conflicto. 27 de febrero de 2009, Bloomberg), que llevó a UBS a rellenar los Fondos UBS con Bonos de los Sistemas de Retiro.

UBS PR Funds Also Bought $1.35 Billion of UBS Underwritten COFINA Bonds in 2007 and 2008

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA and Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA Versión en Español

Yesterday we showed that UBS underwrote $1.7 billion of unmarketable ERS bonds and bought them into the UBS PR Funds in 2008, available here. Today, we show similar conflicts led UBS to underwrite unmarketable 2007 and 2008 Puerto Rico Sales Tax Financing Corporation (COFINA) bonds and stuff them into the Funds. COFINA issued two series of bonds in 2007 and one Series in 2008.

COFINA 2007 Series A

UBS Investment Bank was 1 of 19 co-underwriters of the $2.7 billion Series A bonds targeting mainland investors. See Figure 1.

Figure 1 Cropped 1st Page of COFINA 2007 Series A Offering Circular (full document available here)

COFINA 2007 Series B

UBS Financial Services of Puerto Rico was the lead underwriter (with 11 co-underwriters) of the $1.33 billion Series B bonds sold only to Puerto Rican investors. See Figure 2.

Figure 2.Cropped 1st Page of COFINA 2007 Series B Offering Circular (full document available here)

We don’t know how much of the COFINA 2007 Series B bonds UBS committed to sell but we do know UBS purchased $614 million or 46% of the $1.330 billion COFINA 2007 Series B bonds into its proprietary funds. See Figure 3.


Figure 3. UBS Purchased $614 million of COFINA 2007 Series B Bonds for Its Funds
 
COFINA 2008 Series A

In 2008, UBS Financial Services of Puerto Rico was the sole underwriter of the $737 million Series B bonds sold only to Puerto Rican investors. None of the other 18 underwriters of the 2007 Series A or of the other 11 underwriters of the 2007 Series B COFINA bonds participated in the 2008 Series B COFINA bonds. See Figure 4.

Figure 4. Cropped 1st Page of COFINA 2008 Series A Offering Circular (full document available here)

UBS purchased 100% of the $737 million COFINA 2008 Series A bonds into its proprietary funds. See Figure 5.

Figure 5. UBS Purchased $735 million of COFINA 2008 Series A Bonds for Its Funds

As with the ERS bonds, UBS bought the COFINA bonds it underwrote in 2007 and 2008, making room for these bonds by selling other portfolio holdings. There was no other market for the COFINA 2008 Series A bonds or UBS used its control of its proprietary funds to maximize its fees from underwriting and selling the 2008 COFINA Series A bonds.

We’ve written extensively about the UBS Puerto Rican Municipal Bond Funds. You can find our earlier blog posts here. In a December 2013 post here we wrote of the conflicts of interest first identified by David Evans of Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, February 27, 2009, Bloomberg) which led UBS to stuff the Retirement System Bonds into UBS’s Funds.


Thursday, November 6, 2014

UBS Succumbed to Conflicts and Purchased $1.7 Billion of Employee Retirement System Bonds into its Puerto Rican Municipal bond Funds in 2008

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA and Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA Versión en Español

In today’s post we show that UBS underwrote unmarketable Employee Retirement System bonds and bought them into the UBS Funds in 2008. Friday, we’ll show similar conflicts led UBS to underwrite unmarketable 2008 COFINA bonds and then stuff them into the UBS Funds.

The Puerto Rican Employee Retirement System was acutely and chronically underfunded. Figure 1 is a plot of the PR funding ratio and the median of the 50 states’ funding ratios. The states median funding ratio fluctuated between 80% and 100% from 1990 to 2013 while the PR funding ratio was approximately 20% until 2008 after which it dropped even further. For context, the next three worst average funding ratios from 2007 to 2011 were Illinois at 51%, Connecticut at 58% and Kentucky at 59%.

Figure 1. Puerto Rico Employee Retirement System Funding Ratio 1990-2012
Merrill Lynch attempted to sell $7 billion of ERS Pension Obligation Bonds in 2007 but failed.1 UBS replaced Merrill Lynch as advisor to the ERS and was the lead underwriter of the ERS $1,588,810,800 2008 Series A bonds. See Figure 2.

Figure 2. Cropped 1st Page of ERS 2008 Series A Offering Circular (full document available here)
UBS was the lead underwriter on the 2008 Series A ERS bonds but there were 11 other underwriters including Merrill Lynch, Citi and Wachovia. We don’t currently have information on how much of the 2008 Series A ERS bonds UBS committed to sell but we do know that it purchased 41% of the issue into its proprietary bond funds. See Figure 3. We also know that UBS bought some 2008 Series A bonds into individual Puerto Rican customer accounts.

Figure 3. UBS Purchased 41% of ERS 2008A Bonds for Its Proprietary Funds
The excerpt from the first page of the 2008 Series A ERS Offering Circular in Figure 2 includes the following language.

The System currently contemplates offering additional parity Bonds (the “Series B Bonds”) in other jurisdictions. The Series B Bonds would be offered by means of one or more separate Official Statements and may not under any circumstances be purchased by residents of Puerto Rico.

Page 7 of the January 29, 2008 Series A Offering Circular expands on the commitment to not sell 2008 Series B bonds in Puerto Rico. See Figure 4. The language excerpted from the 2008 Series A Offering Circular in Figures 2 and 4 is unambiguous and was protection for Puerto Rican investors in the 2008 Series A bonds since the Series B bonds would be on par with the Series A bonds and would only be issued if the Series B bonds passed the market test.

Figure 4. Excerpt from page 7 of ERS 2008A Offering Circular (full document available here)
The Offering Circular for the $1,058,634,613 2008 ERS Series B was published on May 28, 2008. See Figure 5.

Figure 5. Cropped 1st Page of ERS 2008 Series B Offering Circular (full document available here)

Something dramatic happened between January 29, 2008 and May 28, 2008. Rather than only being available to non-Puerto Rican residents as promised four months earlier, the 2008 Series B ERS bonds would only be sold to Puerto Rican residents. See Figure 6.

Figure 6. Excerpt from page 7 of ERS 2008 Series B Offering Circular.

Not only was there no market outside of Puerto Rico for the 2008 Series B ERS bonds on the terms they were being offered, there was no market for the bonds on the island either. UBS bought 89% of the 2008 Series B ERS bonds into its proprietary funds. See Figure 7.

Figure 7. UBS Purchased 89% of ERS 2008B Bonds for Its Proprietary Funds
The most interesting non-public documents in the UBS Puerto Rico municipal bond Fund saga will likely be the internal emails and memos at UBS and the communications between UBS and the ERS as they realize that there was no market for the 2008 Series B ERS bonds and the 2008 Series A ERS promise that the Series B bonds will not be sold on the island had to be abandoned.

There was a third and final ERS bond series issued in 2008 – the Series C bonds. UBS was the lead underwriter of the $300 million offering in June 2008. See Figure 8.

Figure 8. Cropped 1st Page of ERS 2008C Offering Circular (full document available here)
As with the 2008 Series A and Series B ERS bonds, the 2008 Series C bonds could only be purchased by Puerto Rican residents. See Figure 9.

Figure 9. Excerpt from page 7 of ERS 2008 Series C Offering Circular.

We don’t currently have information on how much of the 2008 Series C ERS bonds UBS committed to sell but we do know that it purchased 38% of the issue into its proprietary bond funds. See Figure 10.

Figure 10. UBS Purchased 38% of ERS 2008C Bonds for Its Proprietary Funds
UBS’s trading in the ERS 2008 Series C bonds raise some additional questions. By January 2010 the UBS Funds held roughly $50 million of the Series C bonds maturing in 2043 and by September 2011 held $110 million. Unlike the Funds’ purchases of Series A and Series B bonds, the Funds’ $110 million purchases of this bond are not reflected in the EMMA data available here.

We’ve written extensively about the UBS Puerto Rican Municipal Bond Funds. You can find our earlier blog posts here. In a December 2013 post here we wrote of the conflicts of interest first identified by David Evans of Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, February 27, 2009, Bloomberg) which led UBS to stuff the Retirement System Bonds into UBS’s Funds.

1 Near contemporaneous analysis of Merrill Lynch’s failed attempt to underwrite ERS bonds and the harm to ERS caused UBS’s subsequent involvement can be found in Conway MacKenzie, Inc., October 2010, Review of the Events and Decisions That Have Led to the Current Financial Crisis of the Employees Retirement System of the Government of Puerto Rico available here.


En el 2008, UBS Sucumbe Ante Conflictos y Compra $1.7 Billones en Bonos de la Administración de los Sistemas de Retiro para Colocarlos en sus Fondos de Bonos Municipales de Puerto Rico

Por Craig J. McCann, PhD, CFA y Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA English Version

En la entrada de hoy mostraremos cómo en el 2008 UBS suscribió bonos inmercadeables de la Administración de los Sistemas de Retiro y luego los compró para colocarlos en Fondos UBS. El viernes mostraremos cómo conflictos similares llevaron a UBS a suscribir bonos inmercadeables de la COFINA para luego colocarlos nuevamente en Fondos UBS.

El sistema de retiro de empleados de Puerto Rico estaba grave y crónicamente sin recursos suficientes para mantener el pago de sus obligaciones. El Gráfico 1 muestra la tasa de cobertura actuarial (activos netos sobre obligaciones de pensión) de los fondos de retiro de Puerto Rico y la mediana de la tasa para los 50 estados de los Estados Unidos. Entre los años 1993 y 2013 la mediana de la cobertura actuarial para los 50 estados fluctuó entre 80% y 100%, mientras que para Puerto Rico la tasa fue aproximadamente 20% hasta el 2008 y luego continuó cayendo. Para poner esta situación en contexto, en promedio y entre los años 2007 y 2011 los tres estados con la peor tasa de cobertura en los sistemas de pensiones fueron: Illinois con 51%, Connecticut con 58% y Kentucky con 59%.

Gráfico 1. Tasa de Cobertura Actuarial del Sistema de Retiro de Empleados de Puerto Rico. 1990-2012



En el 2007, Merrill Lynch trató de vender $7 billones en Bonos de la Administración de los Sistemas de Retiro (ASR), pero falló1. UBS reemplazó a Merrill Lynch como asesor de la ARS y fue el suscriptor principal de los bonos Serie A del 2008 por un total de $1,588,810,800. Véase el Gráfico 2.

Gráfico 2. Extracto de la 1era Página de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos Serie A 2008 de la ASR (documento completo disponible aquí)



UBS fue el suscriptor principal de los Bonos Serie A de 2008 de la ASR, aunque también hubo 11 otros suscriptores incluyendo a Merrill Lynch, Citi y Wachovia. Actualmente, no tenemos información disponible sobre el compromiso de venta que UBS habría tomado sobre los bonos Serie A 2008 de la ASR, pero sí sabemos que compraron un 41% de la emisión para colocarlos en fondos de bonos de su propiedad. Véase el Gráfico 3. También sabemos que UBS compró parte de los bonos Serie A 2008 para clientes individuales puertorriqueños.

Gráfico 3. UBS Adquirió 41% de los Bonos de la ASR 2008A para sus Propios Fondos



El fragmento de la primera página de la Circular de Oferta de los bonos de la ASR Serie A 2008 en nuestro gráfico 2 dice: “Actualmente, la ASR contempla ofrecer bonos adicionales a paridad (los "Bonos Serie B") en otras jurisdicciones. Los bonos serie B serían ofrecidos por medio de una o más declaraciones oficiales y no podrán en ningún caso ser adquiridos por los residentes de Puerto Rico.”

En la Circular de Oferta de la Serie A Página 7 del 29 de enero de 2008 se expande la idea y el compromiso de no vender bonos Serie B 2008 en Puerto Rico. Véase el Gráfico 4. Los textos extraídos de la Circular de Oferta de la Serie A 2008 mostrados en nuestros gráficos 2 y 4 son muy claros y eran protección para los inversionistas puertorriqueños de Bonos Serie A 2008 dado que los bonos Serie B estarían a la par con la Serie A y sólo se emitirían si los bonos Serie B pasaban la prueba del mercado.

Gráfico 4. Extracto de la página 7 de la Circular de Oferta ASR 2008A (documento completo disponible aquí)


La Circular de Oferta de la ASR Serie B 2008 por el monto de $1,058,634,613 fue publicado el 28 de mayo de 2008. Véase el Gráfico 5.

Gráfico 5. Extracto de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos de la ASR Serie B 2008 (documento completo disponible aquí)



Entre el 29 de enero de 2008 y el 28 de mayo de 2008 ocurrió algo dramático. En vez de ofrecer la Serie B de los bonos de la ASR a no-residentes de Puerto Rico como había sido prometido cuatro meses antes, la Serie B del 2008 sería vendida solamente a residentes puertorriqueños. Véase el gráfico 6.

Gráfico 6. Extracto de la página 7 de la Circular de Oferta de la Serie B de 2008



No sólo no hubo mercado fuera de Puerto Rico para los bonos de la ASR Serie B de 2008 a los términos ofrecidos, sino que tampoco hubo mercado para la venta de estos bonos en la isla. UBS compró el 89% de la Serie B 2008 para colocarlos en sus fondos. Véase el Gráfico 7.

Gráfico 7. UBS adquirió 89% de los Bonos de la ASR 2008B para sus Fondos



La parte más interesante en la saga de los Fondos UBS de Bonos Municipales de Puerto Rico serán los documentos no-públicos tales como los memorandos, correos electrónicos y las comunicaciones entre UBS y la ASR cuando se dieron cuenta de que no había mercado para los bonos de la ASR de la Serie B 2008 y la promesa hecha en los bonos en la Serie A 2008 que tuvieron que romper de que los bonos de la ASR de la Serie B 2008 no serían vendidos en la isla.

Hubo una tercera y última emisión de bonos de la ASR en el 2008 – La Serie C de los bonos. UBS fue el principal suscriptor de la oferta de $300 millones hecha en junio de 2008. Véase el gráfico 8.

Gráfico 8. Extracto de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos de la ASR 2008C, Página 1 (documento completo disponible aquí)



Al igual que las Serie A y la Serie B de los Bonos de la ASR 2008, la Serie C 2008 de los bonos sólo podía ser comprada por residentes puertorriqueños. Véase el Gráfico 9.

Gráfico 9. Extracto de la página 7 de la Circular de Oferta de los Bonos ASR 2008 Serie C



Actualmente, no tenemos información disponible sobre el compromiso de venta que UBS habría tomado sobre los bonos Serie C 2008 de la ASR, pero sí sabemos que compraron un 38% de la emisión para colocarlos en fondos de bonos de su propiedad. Véase el gráfico 10.

Actualmente no se dispone de información sobre la cantidad de 2008 bonos Serie C ERS UBS ha comprometido a vender, pero lo que sí sabemos es que compró 38% de la emisión en su propiedad los fondos de bonos. Vea la Figura 10.

Gráfico 10. UBS Adquirió 41% de los Bonos de la ASR 2008C para sus Propios Fondos



El comercio por parte de UBS de los bonos Serie C 2008 de la ASR plantea algunas preguntas adicionales. En enero de 2010, Los Fondos UBS poseían aproximadamente $50 millones de los bonos Serie C con vencimiento en 2043 y para septiembre 2011 aumentó a $110 millones. A diferencia de las compras por los Fondos de los bonos Serie A y Serie B, las compras de $110 millones por parte de los Fondos no están reflejadas en la base de datos EMMA disponibles aquí.

Hemos escrito extensamente sobre fondos UBS de bonos municipales puertorriqueños. Pueden encontrar nuestra entrada anterior aquí. En la entrada de diciembre de 2013 disponible aquí escribimos sobre los conflictos de interés identificados por primera vez por David Evans de Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, 27 de Febrero de 2009, Bloomberg), que llevaron a que los Fondos de UBS compraran bonos de la Administración del Sistema de Retiro.

1Análisis contemporáneo acerca del intento fallido de Merrill Lynch en suscribir bonos de la ASR y el daño causado por UBS a la ASR puede ser encontrado en el artículo de Conway MacKenzie, Inc. de octubre de 2010, Review of the Events and Decisions That Have Led to the Current Financial Crisis of the Employees Retirement System of the Government of Puerto Rico disponible aquí.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

UBS Stuffed $2.5 Billion of ERS and COFINA Bonds it Underwrote in Its Puerto Rican Funds in 2007 and 2008

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA and Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA Versión en Español

We’ve written extensively about the UBS Puerto Rican Municipal Bond Funds. You can find our earlier blog posts here. In a January 2014 blog post available here, we pointed out that the losses suffered by investors in the UBS PR Funds were caused by the portfolios’ high leverage and concentration in Employee Retirement System and Sales Tax Authority (COFINA) bonds. In a December 2013 post here we wrote of the conflicts of interest first identified by David Evans of Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, February 27, 2009, Bloomberg) which led UBS to stuff the Retirement System Bonds into UBS’s Funds.

In a series of blog posts this week and next week we’ll document UBS’s conversion of its Funds’ portfolios in 2008. As we’ll explain Wednesday, UBS underwrote unmarketable Employee Retirement System bonds and bought these conflicted bonds into the UBS Funds in 2008. On Friday, we’ll show the same conflicts led UBS to underwrite unmarketable 2008 COFINA bonds and then stuff them into the UBS Funds. Next week we’ll further develop the harm to investors UBS caused by stuffing the conflicted ERS and COFINA bonds into its Funds.

Figure 1 and Figure 2 illustrate how UBS dramatically changed the UBS Puerto Rico Funds in late 2007 and early 2008 using the Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II and Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II as examples. UBS sold off $350 million other bonds and bought $530 million of ERS and COFINA bonds it underwrote in these two funds alone.

Figure 1 summarizes the market value of Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II holdings by issuer on June 30, 2007 (from 2nd Quarter 2007 Quarterly Review available here), November 30, 2007 (from the Annual Report available here) and on November 30, 2008 (from the Annual Report available here).

Figure 1. Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II Holdings by Issuer Category
The Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II held no COFINA bonds on June 30, 2007. UBS participated in COFINA underwritings on July 13, 2007 (COFINA Series 2007A Offering Circular available here) and on July 18, 2007 (COFINA Series 2007B Offering Circular available here). We don’t currently have the 3rd Quarter 2007 Quarterly Review but the November 30, 2007 Annual Report shows the Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II Fund then owned $93.4 million of COFINA bonds. UBS was the sole underwriter of the (COFINA Series 2008A Offering Circular available here.)

The Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II held no ERS bonds on November 30, 2007. UBS participated in underwriting three series of ERS bonds in 2008. The Series 2008A Offering Circular is available here, the Series 2008B Offering Circular is available here and the Series 2008C Offering Circular is available here.

Between June 30, 2007 and November 30, 2008 UBS caused the Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II to pay $188,943,300 for the ERS and COFINA bonds and these two issuers’ bonds went from 0% of the Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II portfolio to 50% of the gross assets and 98% of the net assets of the Fund. UBS sold roughly $190 million of other issuers’ bonds out of the Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II to make room for the ERS and COFINA bonds it was underwriting.

Figure 2 presents holdings by issuer for the Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II on June 30, 2007 (from Quarterly Review available here), November 30, 2007 (from the Annual Report available here) and on November 30, 2008 (from the Annual Report available here).

Figure 2. Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II Holdings by Issuer Category


The Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II held no COFINA or ERS bonds on June 30, 2007. Between June 30, 2007 and November 30, 2008 UBS caused the Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II to pay $340,357,374 for the ERS and COFINA bonds and these two issuers’ bonds the ERS and COFINA bonds went from 0% of the Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II portfolio to 44% of the gross assets and 88% of the net assets of the Fund. UBS sold roughly $335 million of other issuers’ bonds out of the Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II to make room for the ERS and COFINA bonds it was underwriting.

 

Durante 2007 y 2008 UBS Rellenó sus Fondos de Puerto Rico con $2.5 Billones de Bonos de ASR y COFINA Suscritos por Ellos Mismos

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA and Edward O'Neal, PhD, CVA English Version

Hemos escrito extensamente sobre los Fondos UBS de Bonos Municipales de Puerto Rico. Pueden encontrar nuestra entrada de blog más reciente aquí. En la entrada de blog de Enero de 2014 disponible aquí, nosotros señalamos que las pérdidas sufridas por los inversionistas de los Fondos UBS PR fueron causadas por el alto apalancamiento y concentración de las carteras en bonos del Sistema de Retiro de Empleados y en la Corporación del Fondo de Interés Apremiante (COFINA). En nuestra entrada de diciembre de 2013 disponible aquí escribimos sobre los conflictos de interés identificados primeramente por David Evans de Bloomberg (David Evans, UBS in Puerto Rico Pension Gets Fee Bonanza Seen as Conflicted, February 27, 2009, Bloomberg), que dio lugar a que UBS llenara sus fondos con Bonos de la Administración de los Sistemas de Retiro (ASR).

Durante esta semana y la próxima habremos publicado una serie de entradas en nuestro blog documentando los cambios que UBS hizo a la cartera de sus Fondos en el 2008. Como explicaremos el miércoles, UBS suscribió bonos inmercadeables del Sistema de Retiro de Empleados y colocó estos bonos en las carteras de sus Fondos en el 2008. El viernes trataremos los mismos conflictos de interés que llevaron a UBS a suscribir bonos inmercadeables de COFINA (en el 2008) para luego colocarlos en Fondos de UBS. La próxima semana desarrollaremos aún más el daño que UBS les causó a los inversionistas al adquirir bonos de la COFINA y de la ASR.

La Tabla 1 y la Tabla 2 ilustran cómo a finales del 2007 y principios del 2008 los Fondos UBS Puerto Rico cambiaron drásticamente sus carteras. Como ejemplos utilizamos los fondos cerrados Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II y Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II. UBS vendió $350 millones de otros bonos y compró $530 millones de bonos suscritos por ellos de COFINA y ASR.

La Tabla 1 resume el valor de mercado de los activos por emisor al 30 de junio de 2007 (del segundo trimestre del 2007 disponible aquí) y al 30 de noviembre del 2007 (en el Informe Anual disponible aquí) y al 30 de noviembre de 2008 (del Informe Anual disponible aquí) del Fondo Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II.

Tabla 1. Activos por Categoría de Emisor del Fondo Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II



La cartera del Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II no poseía bonos de COFINA al 30 de junio de 2007. UBS participó en la suscripción de bonos de COFINA el 13 de julio de 2007 (La Circular de Oferta de los Bonos COFINA serie 2007A disponibles aquí) y el 18 de Julio de 2007 (La Circular de Oferta de los Bonos COFINA serie 2007B disponibles aquí). Actualmente no tenemos el reporte al tercer trimestre del 2007 pero el Reporte Anual al 30 de noviembre de 2007 demuestra que a esa fecha el Fondo Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II poseía $93.4 millones de bonos de COFINA. UBS fue el único suscriptor de los Bonos de (Cofina Serie 2008A según la Circular de Oferta disponible aquí).

La cartera del Tax Free Puerto Rico Fund II no poseía bonos de la ASR al 30 de noviembre de 2007. UBS participó en la suscripción de 3 series de bonos de ASR en el 2008. La Circular de Oferta de la Serie 2008A disponible aquí, la Circular de Oferta de la Serie 2008B disponible aquí, y la Circular de Oferta de la Serie 2008C disponible aquí.

Entre el 30 de junio de 2007 y el 30 de noviembre de 2008 UBS hizo que el fondo Tax Free Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II pagara $188,943,300 en bonos de la ASR y COFINA. Esta acción causó que la cartera del Tax Free Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II pasara a tener de un 0% de bonos de estos dos emisores a tener un 50% de los activos brutos y 98% de los activos netos del Fondo en estos nuevos bonos. UBS vendió aproximadamente $190 millones de otros emisores de bonos de la cartera del Tax Free Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II para hacer espacio para los bonos de la ASR y COFINA que ellos estaban suscribiendo.

La Tabla 2 presenta los activos por emisor del fondo Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II al 30 de junio de 2007 (información del Reporte Trimestral disponible aquí), al 30 de noviembre de 2007 (El Reporte Anual disponible aquí) y el 30 de noviembre de 2008 (El Reporte Anual disponible aquí).

La Tabla 2. Activos por Categoría de Emisor del Fondo Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II

Al 30 de junio de 2007 el Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II no poseía bonos de la COFINA o de la ASR. Entre el 30 de junio de 2007 y el 30 de noviembre de 2008 UBS hizo que el Puerto Rico Fixed Income Fund II comprara $340, 357,374 de bonos de la ASR y COFINA y el porcentaje de estos dos emisores en la cartera del fondo paso de un 0% a un 44% de los activos brutos y un 88% de los activos netos del fondo. UBS vendió aproximadamente $335 millones en bonos de otros emisores para hacer espacio a los bonos de la ASR y COFINA que ellos estaban suscribiendo.

Monday, November 3, 2014

La Comisión de Bolsa de Valores Impone Sanciones a los Agentes de Bolsa por la Venta de Bonos Municipales de Puerto Rico

Por Craig J. McCann, PhD, CFA English Version

La Comisión de Bolsa de Valores (SEC por sus siglas en inglés) anunció el día de hoy sanciones contra 13 compañías de corretaje. En marzo del 2014, estas compañías vendieron denominaciones por debajo de los $100,000 en contra del documento de oferta de los riesgosos bonos municipales de Puerto Rico. El comunicado de prensa con los enlaces individuales de cada orden lo pueden encontrar aquí.

Kyle Glazier y Lynn Hume publicaron el primer artículo relacionado a las ventas de denominaciones menores de bonos de Puerto Rico en contra de lo estipulado en el documento de oferta. Su artículo “Corredores Violan Declaración Oficial de Puerto Rico, MSRB (Junta de Reglamento de Valores Municipales en inglés) Vota a Favor de Transacciones al Detalle” fue publicado en Bond Buyer. Los artículos “FINRA Examinando Compraventa de Bonos de Puerto Rico” y “FINRA Dice Estar Examinando Compraventa de los Nuevos Bonos de Puerto Rico” publicados en The Wall Street Journal y en Bloomberg respectivamente, continuaron la historia de Bond Buyer y reportaron que FINRA (La Autoridad Reguladora de la Industria Financiera por sus siglas en inglés) estaba investigando las transacciones sospechosas.

El documento de oferta de los bonos de Puerto Rico (disponible aquí) especifica que la venta de dichos instrumentos financieros deben de ser vendidos en denominaciones mayores a los $100,000. El artículo de The Bond Buyer señala que durante los primeros días (antes de las 4.57 pm del 18 de marzo de 2014) 70 transacciones de clientes fueron hechas por debajo de la denominación mínima estipulada para proteger a los inversionistas

No pierdan su tiempo buscando estas transacciones en la base de datos EMMA. Como habíamos dicho en nuestro artículo “La Historia Reescrita por la Junta de Reglamentos de Valores Municipales” dicha institución (MSRB por sus siglas en inglés) editó las cintas para borrar o modificar las transacciones anteriormente mencionadas aún cuando estas habían sido cerradas.

The Securities and Exchange Commission Sanctions Brokers Over Sale of Puerto Rican Municipal Bonds

By Craig McCann, PhD, CFA Versión en Español

The Securities and Exchange Commission announced sanctions today against 13 brokerage firms for selling high risk Puerto Rican municipal bonds in March 2014 in denominations well below the $100,000 minimum specified in the offering circular. The SEC press release with links to the individual orders can be found here.

Kyle Glazier and Lynn Hume broke the story about small denomination trades in the Puerto Rico bond offering in contravention of the offering document in the Bond Buyer, Brokers Violate Puerto Rico OS, MSRB Rules with Retail Trades. The Wall Street Journal’s Finra Examining Trading in Puerto Rico Bonds and Bloomberg’s Finra Says It’s Examining Trading in New Puerto Rico Bonds both followed the Bond Buyer story and reported that FINRA was looking into the suspect trades.

The Puerto Rico offering document (available here) says the bonds can only be traded in denominations greater than $100,000. The Bond Buyer story pointed out that 70 customer trades in the first few days of trading (by 4:57 pm on March 18, 2014) were below this minimum denomination intended to protect investors.

Don’t look for these trades in the EMMA data. As we wrote about in The MSRB Re-Writes History, the MSRB edited the tape to delete or modify these trades even though they had already settled.